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Breakfast Ideas for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

Published:February 20, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1053/j.jrn.2019.12.002

      Intended Audience: Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

      After the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD), a restricted diet may be necessary to avoid additional stress on the kidneys, as well as avoiding further health complications.
      Eating right for chronic kidney disease. NIDDKD.
      With the vast information available on the internet, one can find countless recipes for every meal, health concern, and occasion. Recipes and meal ideas for CKD are no exception. However, one should exercise caution and use their best judgment when using recipes from online searches as not all sources are credible. In addition, while there is an abundance of lunch and dinner ideas, breakfast ideas for patients with CKD are in a seemingly shorter supply.
      • Ford M.
      Breakfast for chronic kidney disease. Renal Diet Menu Headquarters.
      ,
      Kidney Community Kitchen. The Kidney Foundation of Canada.
      While breakfast can be a potentially easy meal for patients with CKD to modify to meet their needs, there are numerous common ingredients and items that they need to monitor. Many of the premade breakfast items that are available from the freezer sections of the grocery store are high in sodium. These items might include breakfast sausage, ham, bacon, frozen breakfast sandwiches, French toast, waffles, and pancakes. One can still enjoy these items, but they should be altered to reduce sodium content. One option would be for patients to make these items from scratch using a modified recipe that is lower in salt. Fresh foods made from scratch are typically lower in sodium than their premade counterparts.
      Another option, if the patient prefers to purchase premade items, would be to look for low-sodium labels on these foods. With products that are marketed as low-sodium items, it is imperative to still check the nutrition facts label for the sodium content. Some foods that are marketed as low-sodium items are actually not low in salt at all. It is important to assess how these foods fit into the daily sodium restriction of around 2-3 g or 2,000-3,000 mg per day. In addition, a food item that is low in sodium on the nutrition facts label in the United States will say 15% or less of the daily value.
      Eating right for chronic kidney disease. NIDDKD.
      Another area of concern for patients with CKD regarding breakfast items is potassium. Many breakfast staple foods or recipes center on dairy products, which are high in potassium and phosphorus.
      Eating right for chronic kidney disease. NIDDKD.
      Some examples include French toast, pancakes, and pastries. Milk is also often added to an egg wash for omelettes or scrambled eggs. One's favorite milk substitute can be used in place of dairy with the same end products. With some recipes such as scrambled eggs and omelettes, water can also be used in place of milk.
      Vegetables that are high in potassium, such as spinach, tomatoes, potatoes, and avocado, can be substituted for vegetables that are lower in potassium such as peppers, kale, asparagus, mushrooms, or onions.
      As mentioned earlier regarding dairy foods, phosphorus should be limited in the diet for those with CKD.
      Eating right for chronic kidney disease. NIDDKD.
      Examples of other foods that are high in phosphorus include processed meats, bran cereals, beans, oatmeal, and nuts. Trying to incorporate organic phosphorus food in place of inorganic phosphorus food can reduce the amount of phosphorus your body absorbs. When purchasing meats to be used in a breakfast recipe, be sure to look out for any added phosphates or to ask the butcher for meat with no phosphorus added.
      Additional considerations for patients with CKD are fat and protein.
      Eating right for chronic kidney disease. NIDDKD.
      ,
      Diabetes & kidney Disease: what to eat? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
      To be heart healthy, large amounts of saturated fats, such as those found in butter, coconut oil, and red meat, should be limited in lieu of healthier fats such as olive oil and learner proteins such as chicken. Protein should be eaten in low to moderate amounts for patients who are not currently on dialysis. Those on dialysis have increased protein needs but should still strive for leaner cuts of meat to avoid high amounts of saturated fats.
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      References

      1. Eating right for chronic kidney disease. NIDDKD.
        • Ford M.
        Breakfast for chronic kidney disease. Renal Diet Menu Headquarters.
      2. Kidney Community Kitchen. The Kidney Foundation of Canada.
      3. Diabetes & kidney Disease: what to eat? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.