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Update on the quality and health literacy demand of diet related videos on YouTube for people with Polycystic Kidney Disease

  • Kelly Lambert
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Kelly Lambert, School of Medical, Indigenous, and Health Sciences Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, Building 41.309, Northfields Ave, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, 2522, Australia. Phone: 612 4221 5251; Fax: 612 42534504.
    Affiliations
    Senior Lecturer, School of Medical, Indigenous, and Health Sciences, Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, 2522, Australia
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  • Chiara Miglioretto
    Affiliations
    Accredited Practising Dietitian, School of Medical, Indigenous, and Health Sciences, Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, 2522, Australia
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  • Arefeh Javadpour
    Affiliations
    Accredited Practising Dietitian, Better Care Medical Centre, 88-90 Princes Hwy, Fairy Meadow, New South Wales, 2519, Australia
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Published:October 30, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1053/j.jrn.2022.10.006
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      Abstract

      Objective

      To describe the quality and health literacy demand of publicly available diet related videos on YouTube for people with Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD).

      Design and methods

      This desk-based content analysed involved a comprehensive search of YouTube using key words relating to the dietary management of people with PKD. The health literacy demand was evaluated using the Patient Education Material Assessment Tool (PEMAT) for audio-visual materials. A PEMAT score of >70% is indicative of videos that are understandable and actionable.

      Results

      A total of 15 videos were evaluated (median 1.28 minutes duration (range: 55 seconds to 81 minutes). The majority were produced by reputable sources (such as a PKD related charity (n= 12) or Nephrologist (n= 2). The quality of the videos was high with the majority (14/15) providing evidence-based advice. The understandability and actionability of the videos were considered low (median PEMAT score 67% (IQR: 51.4-81.7) and 66.83 % (IQR: 50-67) respectively.

      Conclusion

      There has been a small increase in the number of diet related videos for people with PKD in the past five years. The majority provide evidence-based information, which is also a substantial improvement since the last analysis in 2015. Unfortunately, the health literacy demand of these resources remains suboptimal, and future work should be directed to improving the understandability and actionability of videos.

      Keywords

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